SportBusiness International

Analysis and insight for the global sports business

The Numbers Game: Big Data and the Business of Sport

The Numbers Game: Big Data and the Business of Sport

Published date:
11 Dec 2015
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The specific nature of on-field metrics has enabled sports analytics to come a long way in a comparatively short time: from goal expectancy and earned run average to strike rate and line breaks, almost every aspect of play and performance is now being tracked, benchmarked and fed into tactics, training programmes and transfer strategies by almost every major team in every major league worldwide.

What's included:

- Definition of big data and who uses it

- Case studies to illustrate the how and why big data is used

- Different types of big data and how it is collected

- How big data is interpreted and used to drive company strategy

- The limitations, considerations and dangers of big data now and in the future

 

Report Items

Article
11 Dec 2015

Man has been collecting and analysing data for centuries. From Dr. John Snow’s mapping of the London Cholera Outbreak of 1854 to statistical visualisations of Florence Nightingale after the Crimean War, we have a long history of counting, observing and collating data to solve problems and make new discoveries in everything from healthcare and education to commerce and defence.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

The specific nature of on-field metrics has enabled sports analytics to come a long way in a comparatively short time: from goal expectancy and earned run average to strike rate and line breaks, almost every aspect of play and performance is now being tracked, benchmarked and fed into tactics, training programmes and transfer strategies by almost every major team in every major league worldwide.

 Read on
Article
11 Dec 2015

When people think of big data, they tend to think in numbers: how many, how much, how often. And the tendency to do so is potentially stronger in sport than in many other businesses: results, records, league positions and personal bests. In the playing arena, it is the numbers that really count, but on the commercial side of the industry, sport remains a people business and its USPs are built around the human qualities of passion, emotion, pride and community.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

The age of big data has been created by the ability of technology to track almost everything we do, not just digitally but in the ‘real-world’ too; consumers are not necessarily producing more data, we are just able to capture more of it than ever before and do so from across an ever-widening range of sources. ‘Datafication’ is the term most used to describe this shift.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

Unstructured and semi-structured data has been made fashionable by its association with social media, and the new possibilities these channels offer of collecting first-hand opinion and sentiment in real-time. However, this data has long been a part of the sports research mix – on the brand side at least – through quantitative and qualitative surveying.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

Ever since the early years of the postal system, when letters were routinely opened in transit, the information we communicate to others – and the way in which the recipients handle it – has posed a threat to individual privacy. The introduction of successive technologies, from the telegram and the telephone to e-mail and social media, has only created a whole new set of risks each time.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

In 2013, the NFL (National Football League) produced a set of minimum standards for stadium connectivity across the league. This was in response to four successive years of attendance decline between 2008 and 2011 and in an effort to offer spectators access to the new media content that significantly upgraded the in-home viewing experience over the same period.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

The Rugby Football League (RFL), the governing body of the sport in England, has been developing a data-driven approach to its commercial and marketing activities over the past five years and focuses much of its CRM attention on building a single view of its customers from a wide range of touchpoints. These include ticket buying, volunteering, local club play and coaching.

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Article
11 Dec 2015

The process of identifying the type of communication or media content that will attract the attention and enable the engagement of sports fans is another manifestation of the segmentation approach discussed in Chapter 9. Demographics and transactional data will, again, be a starting point, but content segmentation is as much about what consumers like as about what they do or who they are. This means attitudinal data, social media metrics and web browsing become much more important identifiers of preference.

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