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Long Read: Why the ‘golden age’ of the sports documentary risks becoming formulaic TV

Michael Jordan (l) and Scottie Pippen (r), each key members of the 1990s Chicago Bulls dynasty. (Photo by Kent Smith/NBAE via Getty Images).

The Last Dance and Drive to Survive raised the bar in sports documentary making. But as rights-holders from golf to tennis follow the path of F1 with behind-the-scenes series, SportBusiness asks filmmakers and broadcasters whether the so-called golden age of non-live sports production risks becoming a factory of formulaic TV.

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