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Windsor keen on further Fina events after World Championships success

Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkens has said the Canadian city would be interested in hosting future Fina events after revealing that the organisation’s 2016 World Swimming Championships (25m) generated over C$32m (€21.4m/US$25m) of “economic activity” for the city.

An economic impact study conducted by the Canadian Sports Tourism Alliance found that last year’s competition, which ran from December 6-11 at the WCFU Centre, resulted in a surplus of C$146,311 for Windsor.

Deputy Treasurer Tony Ardovini has urged Windsor to use these funds to help finance “aquatics equipment to help grow the sport of competitive swimming” in the city. It has also been recommended that a further funding surplus of $116,191, specifically related to the city’s C$3m investment in the event, be rolled into its capital budget for 2018.

These expenditures supported C$13m in wages and salaries in the Ontario province through the creation of 191 jobs. A total of C$8.1m in salaries, and 125 of the jobs, were supported in Windsor, while the report also said that the Fina event widely supported tax revenues in Canada.

Dilkens said: “I think the results were very, very positive and I think the city should be looking at more opportunities when it makes sense. All those who were present had a chance to experience a world-class swimming event. It was a great event for Windsor.”

A total of 864 swimmer from 153 countries took part in the 2016 event, while Fina said more than 460 million people around the world tuned in to watch coverage of the competition on television.

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