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Watkins out as NISA interim Commissioner

Just months before the National Independent Soccer Association (NISA) will kick off its first season, its interim commissioner has stepped down.

Bob Watkins, who had served as interim commissioner, will return to his role advising his NISA club, San Diego 1904 FC, and John Prutch, the managing partner of Club 9 Sports will take over. Club 9, a sports consulting firm has been heavily involved in developing the NISA concept and launch.

In addition to Watkins, SportBusiness has learned that several other executive changes have been made this week by NISA. The new executive team will need to hit the ground running since the league plans to kickoff this fall.

Watkins assumed  his position with NISA last year with the goal of achieving provisional sanctioning from the United States Soccer Federation (USSF). NISA achieved sanctioning in February 2019 , and has since been working toward an August or September 2019 kickoff.

“This was a short, intense endeavor and I wish those involved the best of luck as they take on the task of getting their clubs onto the pitch,” Watkins said.

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