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USL voluntarily recognizes newly-formed players union

The United Soccer League has announced that clubs in the USL Championship division have officially recognized the USL Players Association (USLPA) as an independent labor union and the exclusive bargaining representative of its players.

“We look forward to working through this process with the USLPA and our individual franchises, and we are confident that our league, our clubs, our players, coaches and our fanbase will all be stronger as a result,” said USL chief executive Alec Papadakis. “In many ways, this is simply the next, natural step in the evolution of building a great and enduring professional soccer league.”

The USLPA Executive Committee issued a statement: “Today is a historic day in US soccer history with the USL’s recognition of the player organized USLPA. We see this as a significant step forward in the continued development of both the USL and the US soccer landscape. We are extremely grateful to the players for designating the USLPA as their bargaining representative and look forward to communicating with all players about the next steps in this process. Additionally, we look forward to partnering with the league to not only improve conditions for all players, but to grow the stature of the league and the fan bases across North America.”

The result of the formation of the union will be the negotiation of a collective bargaining agreement which will govern the future employment terms between the players and their USL Championship clubs.

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