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Toronto to host 2017 Invictus Games

Organisers of the Invictus Games have announced that the 2017 edition of the multi-sport event for wounded servicemen and women will be staged next September in Toronto, Canada.

The Games took place for the first time in London, England in 2014, with the second edition of the event due to be staged at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in the Floridian city of Orlando from May 8-12.

The announcement of Toronto as host for the 2017 event was made by the UK’s Prince Harry, patron of the Invictus Games Foundation. The organisation was established to develop and pursue the event’s legacy, as well as set out requirements for future host cities and ensure the Games meet certain quality standards.

In a statement, the foundation said Toronto’s successful bid “demonstrated a real understanding of the core concept and vision of the Games” and also highlighted the city’s sporting venues and infrastructure as key reasons behind the decision. Last year, Toronto also played host to the 2015 Pan American/Parapan American Games.

“The last Invictus Games inspired tens of thousands of people and was enjoyed by millions of others around the world,” Prince Harry said. “I always hoped the Invictus story would continue after the London games. And having seen so many new people benefit from their journey to Orlando this year, I definitely didn't want it to end here.

“2017 is a year steeped in rich Canadian military history, marking the anniversaries of historic battles that shaped and defined the nation. It's also the year when Canada will commemorate its 150th anniversary of Confederation.”

Michael Burns, chief executive for the Invictus Games Toronto 2017 local organising committee, added: “This country’s non-military citizens actively look for ways to express their gratitude to our military, and the Invictus Games will provide an ideal forum for what we know will be an unprecedented outpouring of support.”

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