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Sunderland shares likely to be bought by new US-based majority owner

Just thirteen months after the purchase of the club, Sunderland owner Stewart Donald appears poised to sell the majority of his shares to American stockbroker Mark Campbell. Campbell will take controlling interest in the club before the end of June according to multiple published reports.

Campbell attended the League One playoff final at Wembley last week which Sunderland lost. Rumors have been circulating about Donald’s desire to sell the club over the course of the last month, however it appears Campbell is the only serious potential buyer left.

Minority owner Charlie Methven, who holds six per cent of the club’s shares, spoke to The Daily Mail about the current ownership situation.

“We expect a resolution or some clarity before the end of June and in time for pre-season,” Methven said. “It is a case of re-examining the situation and asking, ‘Is it the right deal at the right time?’ We have to consider what we think is best for the club in the short, medium and long term.”

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