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Oakland A’s stadium runs into potential roadblock from maritime industry

The proposed Oakland A’s waterfront ballpark is facing opposition from the region’s maritime industry. The building of the new ballpark is a priority of MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred, who has frozen expansion until Oakland and Tampa Bay’s stadium situations are resolved.

It is being reported by The San Francisco Chronicle that the maritime industry is claiming the stadium project and adjoining housing development would “pose both a safety risk to ships and a threat to the port’s future as a major, regional economic engine”.

“Between the traffic congestion it will bring, the navigational risks it will pose to shipping vessels and the land-use conflicts it will create, there’s no way for this project to proceed without doing irreparable harm to Oakland’s working waterfront,” said Mike Jacob, vice-president at the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association told The Chronicle.

The proposed waterfront park at Howard Terminal is a backup site for the A’s, who originally sought a downtown facility, but met community opposition.

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