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Exclusive: Roller sports head slams IOC process

Sabatino Aracu, president of the International Federation for Roller Sports (FIRS), believes the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should scrap its sports application process.

Roller sports, along with wushu, sport climbing, karate and wakeboarding, failed to be shortlisted for the chance to join the Olympic schedule in seven years’ time. Instead, squash, wrestling and a joint baseball/softball bid will be vying for the final place at a vote in Buenos Aires this September. 

The IOC has come under criticism for the current process, after the governing body recommended wrestling be removed from the core schedule in February, only to give it a chance to be voted straight back in later this year.

Aracu told SportBusiness International today: “In my opinion, the entire selection process should be modified. We have lost any trust in it because, during the years, we had a feeling that the people in charge of decisions do not really know the sports they are selecting, nor do they have the right instruments to make the decisions.

“In addition, we cannot understand the reason why the sports on the shortlist could not be part of the Youth Olympics’ programme, despite their undeniable appeal to young audiences, and that being on the shortlist is evidence that these sports are potentially ‘Olympic’ [standard].”

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