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ECB PROBES ALLEGATIONS OF FIXED DOMESTIC MATCHES.

ECB chairman Lord MacLaurin told BBC Radio 5 Live an inquiry was “ongoing”.
The Sunday Telegraph newspaper said the allegations that the results of the matches – one a county championship game and the other a Sunday League limited overs fixture – were fixed originally came from former Zimbabwe coach and Essex player Don Topley.
His claims in a series of newspaper articles were dismissed some years ago but the Sunday Telegraph said the ECB had decided to reopen investigations earlier this year when further witnesses came forward.
In the championship match Essex, having been set 270 to win in 67 overs, won by eight wickets and went on to take the title by 13 points.
In the Sunday match Essex made a modest 169 for six from 40 overs after being put in and Lancashire knocked off the runs with five wickets and five balls to spare. Lancashire went on to finish runners-up to Nottinghamshire for the title.
McLaurin told Radio 5 Live: “We haven’t completed the inquiry. It is ongoing and as and when, we will have something to say about that. I’m not prepared to say any more.”
Malcolm Gray, the new president of the International Cricket Council (ICC), told the same programme that Indian police had done “an excellent job” in probing corruption in the game.
An Indian Central Bureau of Investigation report into match-fixing last week named nine former international captains among prominent cricketers accused of links with bookmakers.
“But the fact that people have been mentioned doesn’t mean they are guilty,” Gray said. “Some of the names mentioned are not mentioned for doing anything wrong. In fact, some of the mentions are doing the exact opposite and are exonerating people.”
Sir Paul Condon, head of the sport’s ruling body’s anti-corruption unit, told The Mail on Sunday tabloid there would be no hiding place for those who have cheated at any level in the first-class game.
“If anyone is found guilty they have a great deal to fear,” he said. “My advice to any cricketer who had done something wrong is not to compound the issue by prevaricating.”
Reuters